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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
, "moonrise kingdom." 3, "argo," truth wilder than fiction. 2, "lincoln," a history lesson for our time. >> on top "zero dark thirty." the weekend movie guide -- have a great weekend. i'm arch
the world's first true world war. his attack on the french in the western pennsylvania wilderness grew into a global conflict lasting seven years, involve england, franch, austria, russia, prussia, and dozen other nations fighting for control over colonies in north america, africa, asia, and the seas in between. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britai
: it happened along this isolated trail here inside the las trampas regional wilderness preserve in alamoa woman sexually assaulted while she was using the trail investigators with east bay regional park police told methe victim accessed the trail using the hemme avenue entranceparking her car in this lot at around 4pm last wednesday then started walking up the trail's narrow pathinvestigators say some time before 6:45pm the victim and the male suspectcross pathswhen suddenly he pulls her down to the ground from behind and sexually assaults the victim east bay regional park police describe the suspect as a white male in his 40'sabout 5 feet 9 inches tallweighing about 180lbswith brown hairpointed nosewearing a tan bowling shirtblue jeansalso waering a silver wrist watch the suspect was walking a meduim sizedbrown haired dogwith one ear upand one ear down in response east bay regional park police say they have increased patrols in the area along the trailin alamo haaziq madyun kron4news >>catherine: new at six. a south bay charity and it's many patrons are making sure people have food for the hol
boyfriend in the snowy wilderness talks about her ordeal after these messages. one is for a clean, wedomestic energy future that puts us in control. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. we're for the individual. the food lover. the movie lover. the road tripper. and the music mentor. ♪ we're for the gamer. the play maker. the page turner. and the up-all-nighters. so when we set out to make a smart phone we didn't make one for all of us. we made one for each of us. new windows phone. reinvented around you. we made one for each of us. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your
to be outside. much wilder weather coming our way tomorrow. temperatures back into the 60s. so at least it will be a little bit warm error. for the latest on the track. let's go to danella sealock. >> thanks, chuck. >>> you're talking about the rain. i think it's responsible for the fender benders. i-270 southbound at west montgomery avenue, you're going to see your left lane blocked here. crash kind of lined up in the left shoulder lane, but that left lane is blocked. let's talk about delays. they're about five miles. as you make your way from i-370, you can see jammed on i-270 southbound and i-370 as you continue toward the crash there. so expect delays. let's shoot over to i-95 in virginia. starting to see delays there. prince william parkway, you're going to hit the brakes. pretty much stop and go. in the lorton area, you are heavy on the brakes. to get to the beltway, 20 minutes from the occoquan. your average speed is 30 miles per hour. eun, over to you. >> danella, thank you. 6:42 now. >>> new this morning, for the first time we're seeing video of the moment when a woman in a whe
's political wilderness to prepare for government. though his supporters point out that his religiously-worded constitution will easily pass in a referendum set for later this month. >> ( translated ): why are they always afraid of the ballot box? whenever there is an election or a referendum they're afraid of the ballot box. it is because they know the people are not on their side. >> reporter: tahrir square was far from full today. egypt's had its revolution and that, for many, will suffice. yet the president's opponents say another may now be required. >> ( translated ): we didn't have a revolution just to return to the era of mubarak and worse. >> ( translated ): mohamed morsi has divided the nation. we want him to fall. along with the muslim brotherhood because they are traitors. >> reporter: last night, muslim brotherhood offices were set on fire outside cairo. and crowds with these demands are now gathering again outside his palace. >> sreenivasan: three more officials announced their resignation in wake of the violence. late today, in a televised speech, president morsi called f
may not be coming home. but shortly after that, her brother found paula in the snowy wilderness. >> when that call came from my brother, it was a miracle. >> reporter: incredibly, paula not only survived but is expected to fully recover from nothing more than severe than minor frostbite. >> she was one very lucky person. i don't know what she did, what footwear she had, god's good grace, but she was lucky it wasn't more severe. >> reporter: physically she will be fine but her doctor says her psychological healing will take longer after a week- long nightmare. she will recover with an extremely thankful and loving family by her side. >> and last night when my brother called, i took the call, and to hear him say, i found her, i found her, i --i can't explain it for you guys. [ crying ] >> reporter: and paula is expected to be released from the hospital next week. her family tells us that she wants to tell her story. live in carson city, ben sosenko, cbs 5. >>> the governor of new jersey paid a visit to president obama to plead for money to help his state rebuild from superstorm sa
conservative wilderness. but it matters what they do. look at jared bernstein put together today. you know they just revised the number for economic growth for the country for the last quarter. they just revised it today. and it was a good revision. it was a revision upwards. so the third quarter, this last quarter this year we were growing at a rate of 3.1%. it's up almost two points from the quarter before. if they don't get their act together, this is what the congressional budget office says is going to happen to the economic growth rate this quarter. 2%. and look what happens next quarter, the first three months of next year. that's bad. maybe as hourtd dean was saying with ed tonight, maybe we can endure that and we'll come back stronger than ever. but that's bad. that is an economic catastrophe that will hurt a lot of americans for a long time. and maybe you want to bear that brunt. but maybe that happening accidentally because of so much chaos on one side that they can't tell which way's up, which way's down and who's on their own side is not the way to get that. this is like being
plans to turn the land into a marine wilderness area, and as a result, the oyster company and 30 employees are out of work. kevin is the owner of drake's bay and now suing for an injunction to keep his business open. good morning to you, kevin. >> good morning, gretchen. how are you? >> gretchen: doing just fine. thank you for getting up so early. so tell me what you've been doing for all these years, your oyster farm. >> the oyster farm is really kind of a main stay in our community. we produce about a third of the oysters grown in the state of california. we get about 50,000 visitors a year who love this place, been here for over eight decades and the community and our county and san francisco bay area loves ush washington, d.c. >> gretchen: so the interior department wants to shut you down. why? >> well, actually a small handful of folks who are really wilderness activists who care deeply about getting people off the land, i think is the best we can tell, want to give up something to create a humanless landscape and it's a little strange because national sea shore was created
, but not these particular people. and, in fact, the gossip was much wilder than the reality. he had a--it was said that he built the lying-in hospital in new york to take care of all the pregnancies that he was responsible. c-span: lying-in? >> guest: lying-in is a maternity hospital. we don't use that term anymore, although in boston it's still called the boston lying-in. he did actually build that hospital, but there was a less-lurid explanation. his best friend and physician was a man named james w. markoe, who was an obstetrician, and he wanted to build a hospital that would give up-to-date, first-class care to poor women who couldn't afford it. and morgan gave them $1 million to build the hospital and gave $100,000 to it for the rest of his life, which is not what we think of about j.p. morgan, that he was helping poor women have children under the best possible circumstances. c-span: did you spend 15 years on this one subject? >> guest: on j. p. morgan? c-span: yes. c-span: yes. >> guest: yes. but it isn't one subject, it's about 30. c-span: but this one book. >> guest: yes, this one book took me 15
to hold on a little wilder. and we probably wouldn't mind being in our 20s starting over, because that generation of writers, students of mine, will be in on the ground floor of whatever new model is being built now. it will quickly announce and feel unnatural to them. what we would've so much want to be is in her 40s and having fully to adapt to the system that we never anticipated when starting out. the changes over the last 15 years have the sense that we are just at the beginning of them and not all of the signs seem very friendly to me. simon & schuster, which not long ago was getting into video but combinations, "vooks." it sounds at a a much more developed version of it. well, along with that, just edit a simon & schuster announced that it was aligning itself with the self-publishing venture. i would suggest that no publishing house, no matter how dire the times and no matter how much amazon would like to see all editors and all agents go way, should be part of this. because it brings us one step closer to a world without editors. what would be the world with many more elec
about the romney campaign. fred wilder asks i wonder if lynn sweet is a cubs or white sox fan. inquiring minds want to know. >> you're on the spot. >> i'm going to try to make this -- >> bill: don't straddle the fence. >> i'm going to tell you i went back to the cubs once "the chicago tribune" sold them. so my allegiance once "the tribune" bought them many years ago and i was in washington. the nats weren't here yet. it was the os. nats were the nats which still have a prime place in my heart but once "the tribune" company bought the cubs, i could go back. once they sold the cubs -- >> bill: you could go back to the cubs. i think that makes sense. >> i had to and i could not -- somebody might say why not go to the white sox. i will quickly tell you the answer. many years ago the white sox did a deal in springfield illinois, the capital where they got -- i thought it was under the radar deal to get funding for their new stadium. and i don't like under the radar deals so i couldn't go to them because that wa
-term unemployment. secondly, there's clearly some immediate still a gap issues. you hear it in wilders, engineers, and we should be focused on that. third and perhaps most importantly, the long-term issue, which is really more, since we're talking about the future -- it is less of the current skill set and more of a supply-side issue. we should believe that if we have a large enough supply of skilled workers in the field of dreams notion that if we have the degree of skilled workers, it will help location of jobs to come here and we will be more of a magnet for the high skilled jobs of the future. i think that when we are looking at this, though, we should in our policy solutions make sure we are defining policies right said that we are having the right solutions. sometimes when people say "skill gaps, close to what they're talking about the absolute top of the top engineers and physicians. those people we talk about helping to address right now with high skilled immigration, others are talking about the supply of stem workers in our country -- science, technology, engineering, and mathematical w
mag is something that is not needed. try taking a walk in the alaska wilderness and tell a grizzly bear that that the 44 is not needed. the three weapons were shown that this maniac had was a glock,ter , a high-end and a high-end sig sauer. anybody should have those under lock and key. and if they are in a state that has concealed carry, like here in oklahoma we have open carry, which i think is ridiculous. i am a correctional officer at and have been one for 20 years. i don't want a bad guy to know i have a weapon on me. i want to be able to protect the people that are in. whatever in like if i would've been there when gabrielle giffords was shot, it would not have been a little old lady to take the guy down. i would've been one of the first people sending sead his way -- lead his way. guest: thank you for calling. host: a tweet -- guest: i have no idea. if senator mcconnell comes on the show, maybe he will have an answer. host: does it help you as a congressman to have the republican leader from your state in the senate? guest: i don't think it is made any difference of our. ther
about the carnage and the lives lost, the great battle before in fredericksburg and the wilderness. you talk about antietam and you talk about shiloh, manassas, all these battles people defending what they think, a way of life for slavery or what have you, all of that, all that bloodshed settle this contradiction. and we won. we have our country. and i like to go to gettysburg to say to my clerks, do we deserve this? do we deserve the sacrifice for the country that we have and are we living up to that? are we doing our part? >> just go anyplace. think of the people at the battle of the bulge or think of them at you know, during any war and just ask yourself, you know, let's assume without debating whether you should have had this, that, this war that, we have done our part and the thing i was told, was going to be a priest. that was really the only sort of goal that i had. what is a priest? you are called to do something. every ex-seminarian it's all nice like -- your call now is to do your part. to be able to earn the right to be here. >> you can mention in your book very prominently o
in the wilderness to work, we have been sent here to work and we need to get down to it. in the final hours of this congress and we have the threat of working christmas, if we have to do it to get things done, i'm willing to do that, but the majority should help solve the nation's most pressing issue, that's why we're here. do not actively choose to leave the work unfinished. as we silt and wait for gos on the fissclaldeliff, the other -- there is other legislation that's ready that could be done now, could help our markets, relieve the mind of employer, could give security to the middle class and people below that and we certainly ought to be doing it. today's rule simply does the following. all we're doing now at this minute is we're giving the majority the freedom to spend the rest of this month and the rest of this year on minor, noncontroversial legislation. i refuse to give this blank check to a majority that has yet to show any interest in completing the outstanding work. i urge my colleagues to join me in opposing today's rule so we can try to get back to d -- get back to work. toda
that we should not be crying out in the wilderness to work, we have been sent here to work and we need to get down to it. in the final hours of this congress and we have the threat of working christmas, if we have to do it to get things done, i'm willing to do that, but the majority should help solve the nation's most pressing issue, that's why we're here. do not activelyhoose to leave the work unfinished. as we silt and wait for gos on the fissclaldeliff, the other -- there is other legislation that's ready that could be done now, could help our markets, relieve the mind of employer, could give security to the middle class and people below that and we certainly ought to be doing it. today's rule simply does the following. all we're doing now at this minute is we're giving the majority the freedom to spend the rest of this month and the rest of this year on minor, noncontroversial legislation. i refuse to give this blank check to a majority that has yet to show any interest in completing the outstanding work. i urge my colleagues to join me in opposing today's rule so we can try to get
wilderness area. a -- an zend due to lack of maintenance would be devastating. it makes sense for the pipeline to use the existing roadbed for highway 2 in order to minimize the economic impact. my legislation simply solve this is government-made problem by allowing the national park service to allow maintenance on the pipeline. i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from the mariana islands is recognized. mr. sablan: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. sablan: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. sablan: h.r. 4606 clarifies that the national park service may issue right-of-way permits for a natural gas pipeline in glacier national park. the pipeline already exists. the senator introduced this legislation in march of this year. we do not object to this legislation and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from utah is recognized. mr. bishop: i have only myself as the
house members have spent decades in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. appropriations committees work -- in turn the, i think it is significant for the american public to know the appropriations committee work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to your own constituents and taxpayers. within the committee itself, the more we can talk to each other as individuals and human beings, the better off the institution will be. and the more responsive it will be. >> the kinds of organizations that track members' votes, when they look at yours, saw an ad and earlier you more frequently crossed the aisle to vote with democrats. in your later service, 96% rating. is that reflect
should return to play. >> thank you, tom for wilderness foreign and obviously to bob who is that the science and discussion forward dramatically because one of the things we all know is we can't not do nothing or anything. see how many negatives are put in there to make a positive. we have to do something. as a clinician that these kids and families and our clinics in seeing the major education deficit on the fields today in all sports frankly, but also seeing the outcomes. some of the things that raise talking about in terms of understanding forces is really important and we just completed some work in developing measures they are using so we can understand their cognitive symptom kinds of effects of these to kids. i think that's very, very important outcome to what we need to link up with the games. from the perspective -- actually was at the aspen institute this summer, where u.s. nabobs question about, should we be eliminating football -- tackling a football before the age of 14. at that point i couldn't speak, although we did speak that night. one of the things i sai
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)